Free Apron Patterns - Over 190 designs!
191 of the best free Apron Patterns & Tutorials on the web!
Let’s make Aprons! Here you’ll find over one hundred and ninety free apron patterns and tutorials collected from all over
the web. And so many patterns to choose from! Sew full aprons, half aprons, retro & vintage aprons, smock aprons, craft
aprons, child and adult aprons, gathering aprons, bib aprons, aprons with pockets, and simple or elegant aprons. And all of
these pages show you just how pretty and fun aprons can be - both to make and to wear!

And because an apron often consists of simple shapes and is quick to make, it would make an excellent first project for
someone just learning how to sew. The beginner will be able to whip an apron up in almost no time, and be able to have

the satisfaction of a completed project. Plus an apron can be made from a medium-weight broadcloth fabric, which is a
fabric that's easy for a beginner to work with.

And just a reminder: If you’ll be making your apron from several different fabrics and you plan to launder your
finished apron (which is likely), test each of your fabrics for colorfastness. To do this, submerge each fabric individually in
the same water temperature and detergent in which you plan to wash your finished apron. If the
water turns color or if any
dye comes off when you press the wet fabric between layers of a white towel, then your fabric isn’t colorfast. If this is the
case, you may want to choose different fabrics.
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Sewing Information, Advice, How-to
Kid's Sweater Apron
Green Kitchen
One-yard Half
Apron
My Birdhouse
Gardener's Apron
Sew Mama Sew
Sunkissed Aprons
Moda Bake Shop
Piece of Cake Apron
Moda Bake Shop
Sweet Ruffle Apron
Sew Mama Sew
Quilt Story Apron
Moda Bake Shop
Child's Apron
Moda Bake Shop
Halloween Hostess
Apron
Moda Bake Shop
Reversible Apron
Threads Magazine
Spring Apron
Crafty Staci
3 Apron Patterns
Threads Magazine
Full Apron
Sugar Bee Crafts
Note: Clicking any of the following links will take you to another website unless otherwise indicated.
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Note: An asterisk (*) next to a project indicates that it's a PDF file.
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Cafe Apron
I Always Pick the Thimble
Making an apron can be a great way to recycle old clothing (shirts, jeans, or even an old sweater), allowing you to reuse
the fabric and turn it into something useful again. And if you do choose to “upcycle” clothing in this way, it may be easier
for you to sew the item into a half-apron, which requires less fabric.

If you do have an old pair of jeans lying around that you no longer wear (perhaps they no longer fit or the style doesn't suit
you anymore), there are several apron styles listed on these pages (both full and half aprons) that are made from old jeans
to provide you with inspiration. And just a reminder that if you're going to be sewing denim, use a special jeans or denim
needle in your sewing machine. The thicker shaft of a denim needle will be able to pierce through your heavier denim

fabric easily and without breaking.

If you'll be sewing your apron from brand new fabric, remember to preshrink the fabric first (and any trims too), especially

if your fabric is a cotton or a cotton blend (this is assuming you'll be laundering your finished apron, which is likely
considering what an apron is meant to be used for). And with cotton fabric you may even want to launder it more than once
because cotton fabric doesn't always shrink its maximum amount with the first washing.

Keep in mind that an apron doesn't have to just serve a utilitarian purpose. As you can see, there are many apron designs
shown on these pages that are fun and whimsical or quite elegant, looking almost like pretty skirts - aprons that would look
great over a simple cocktail dress if you're hosting party.

And if you do plan to sew one of the more formal aprons, here are a few tips for working with lightweight, sheer, and/or
slippery fabrics: To keep your lightweight fabric from shifting around on your cutting surface, you can try either taping the
edges of the fabric to your cutting surface or lining your cutting surface with muslin. Also, cut the fabric from a single layer
and use a rotary cutter instead of scissors for more accurate cutting. And when sewing your sheer fabric, use a straight-
stitch needle plate which will keep your fabric from getting pushed down into the needle hole as you're sewing.

And if you do need your apron to be more utilitarian than pretty, consider making your apron from a strong cotton duck
fabric, cotton canvas, or denim. Or, to add durability to a lighter-weight fabric, consider adding a lining to your apron. And

if you choose a colorful fabric for your lining, your apron becomes reversible giving you in essence, two aprons in one.

A cute smock apron can make a great gift for the little toddler in your life. And if you do decide to make a child's smock
apron (its purpose being, of course, to protect the child's clothing during arts and craft projects) consider making the apron
from a laminated fabric so it will be water resistant.

And if you do decide to work with a laminated fabric, here are a few tips: Use pins with caution because they can leave
noticeable holes behind in the fabric. And if you need to press the fabric, do so only with your iron set to a low setting and
press only on the non-laminated side. You may also want to use a thicker denim needle in your sewing machine which will
have an easier time penetrating the fabric.

If you plan to make an apron with seam binding applied to the edges, remember that in addition to preshrinking your

fabric, preshrink the seam biding tape (and any other fabric trims or embellishments you'll be adding). You wouldn't want
to launder your beautifully finished apron only to find that the binding has shrunk and puckered around the edges. You may
also want to check your seam binding for color-fastness. (See page 1 for how to check fabric for colorfastness.)